our practice has a special place for women who are hoping to treat symptoms of painful sexual intercourse.

We are experienced and passionate about treating women with any of the diagnosed conditions below

  • vaginismus
  • dyspareunia
  • vulvodynia

Even if you do not have an official diagnosis, you may be finding information online that suggests that your symptoms match with one or more of these terms.  

Statistics suggest that approximately 21% of women ages 18-29* experience painful vaginal intercourse, with these symptoms occurring throughout the lifespan. Painful sex can also be associated with difficulty using tampons or having a gynecological exam. Some women have experienced it their whole lives, while others began having pain after a surgery, infection, traumatic experience, or an unknown cause. Many women experience painful intercourse after birth (whether vaginal or cesarian). 

Many couples seek fertility treatment because they are unable to have vaginal intercourse. Others may already be pregnant and realizing that their history of painful intercourse may affect their birth experience. The pelvic floor dysfunction associated with vaginismus increases the risk of musculoskeletal injury during birth,** so we strongly recommend pelvic physical therapy for women with these symptoms who are hoping to become pregnant or who already are.

Treatment for painful intercourse made available at your pace, with compassionate and knowledgeable guidance from our physical therapists. Some clients participate in a home-based program, while others choose more frequent appointments in clinic.

If you have questions about specific treatment techniques, please email us or schedule a 15min phone consultation. If you know you'd like to get started, we invite you to book a 1 hour initial evaluation at your convenience.


*Lemieux AJ, Bergeron S, Steben M, Lambert B. Do Romantic Partners’ Responses to Entry Dyspareunia Affect Women’s Experience of Pain? The Roles of Catastrophizing and Self-Efficacy. J Sex Med 2013;10:2274–2284.

**Rosenbaum T, Padoa A. Managing Pregnancy and Delivery in Women with Sexual Pain Disorders. J Sex Med 2012;9:1726-1735.